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Django Admin Override Save for Model

Sometimes it's nice to be able to add custom code to the save method of objects in the Django Admin.  So, when editing an object on the Admin object detail page (change form), adding the following method override to your ModelAdmin in admin.py will allow you to add custom code to the save function.

In admin.py:  
class MyModelAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin):

    def save_model(self, request, obj, form, change):
        # custom stuff here
        obj.save()

This is documented in the Django Docs, but I found it particularly useful.

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